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.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
and put a platform together that focuses on them. not everybody in america wants a business and money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work in community groups. spend time at their church. we, as republicans, believe that is a good thing. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an agenda of ideas to raise up folks who want to vote for us. you saw the last election. they did not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. the second thing is we need to talk less about the culture. he people who do this is those who do not want to talk about culture in the first place. as a result, do not engage as we have in this party. i will give you an exa
. -- andrybody in america money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work and community groups. spend time at their church. we as republicans believe that is a good inc.. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. -- that is a good thing. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an upnda of ideas to raise folks who want to vote for us. you side and the last election. they do not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. --st and foremost, we need first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build to becoming, everybody will be fine. -- if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. [applause] the second inc. as we be to talk less about the culture area -- thing is we need to talk less about the culture. the people who do this is who do not want to talk about culture in the firs
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. shimkus: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to remember and recall the life of carla anderson. carla passed away on july 23, after a month-long fight against an infection. she was 52, a loving mother, devoted wife and deputy executive director of the next generation 911 institute. it was in this capacity that i had the privilege of working with her. technology continued to move forward, congresswoman anna eshoo and i worked closely as part of the congressional e-911 congress. she was part of legislation passed by congress to advance 911 services. in so doing, many lives have been saved. as first responders throughout the country could not on
there. what is great about what we've seen with america over the last several years is how resilient we are. after the boston bombings, for example. the next day, folks are out there, going to ball games, making sure we are not reacting in a way that somehow shuts us down. >> right. >> and that is the right reaction. terrorist depend on the fact we will be terrorized. we are going to live our lives and the odds of people dying in a tourist attack are still a lot ,ower than in a car accident unfortunately, but there are things we can do to make sure that we're keeping the pressure on these networks, that will try to injure americans. it is the first thing i think of when i wake up in the last thing i think about before going to bed, is keeping americans safe. host: that was the president last night on "the tonight show" with jay leno. ken walsh has written this piece available online that the president's appearance on "the tonight show", part of his effort to expand the presidencies outreach more widely than ever. other presidents have limited themselves to more traditional approaches su
day i note that children in america suffer for a variety of reasons. the senate, of course, had a bill that they are pushing through that was at the $54 billion. still very far short of the great needs of this community. so i rise today to say that it landed with a thud and i think more importantly my colleague from texas, again, from houston, spoke on the floor of the house about some untimely language on page 52. i remember it. that cut into the light rail system of houston. it would impact my district. it would stop students at the university of houston and texas southern university from being able to have access to rail, cutting down on their travel costs because there was a provision in the bill that did not fund just a sector of that light rail. my colleagues, how can you build light rail when you cut it in the middle like the western movies when the train rushes up and finds a big hole over the mountain where something has happened and it can't go any further? so it was a bill destined to die, should have died because it lacked compassion. and i stand here opposing any language
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
of the united states of america" is a biography and portrait of each first lady. it is now available for the discounted price of $12.95 plus shipping and can be found at c- the c-span town hall meeting that discusses the future of political parties. following that, nancy pelosi. after that, a town hall meeting with senator john mccain. >> this is a c-span townhall. you good tos away, have more of your say. during congress's recess, tuesday, wednesday, and thursday night on c-span, we are looking at public politics and talking to you about positions. welcome to c-span town hall tonight. we will ask you about the future of your political party. who is the future leader, the likely presidential candidate, and maybe it is somebody that is not necessarily yet on the national scene. a couple of ways for you to participate, by phone. we will open up the lines now. make sure you mute your television and radio when you call in. you can also use twitter. we will read tweets from members of congress who are back in their home states and districts for the august recess. some p
of its kind in america, to enable information sharing across the austin medical community. -- austin medical community. medicalgency -- boston community. the reaction after the attack was not accidental. it was a product of years of training and investment in the link state and local capacity and the quick, orderly, focused, and comprehensive response by law enforcement, first responders, and the larger boston community on that day saved lives. immediate control over the scene by law enforcement and assistance from first responders and medical personnel helped you entry theack fallen fallen and injured, a scenario they have practiced to ensure no one facility would be overwhelmed. citizens stepped up and played a critical role, it hearing for the wounded, donating blood, and submitting videos that helped -- aify the suspects powerful reminder of the role the public lays in providing aid but also providing useful information. the reason why after i became secretary, i called for the creation and then expansion of the argument " if you see something say something" campaign, expanding i
is it all of a sudden america's fault? and i couldn't agree more with the previous callers that say we should not give any more money to any nation that behaves this way. detroit is bankrupt. sacramento, california, is bankrupt. we have huge, huge problems over here as far as infrastructure. i think we should take care of our own. i'm a first generation american and i can tell you, these countries, we give money -- they don't share our values, they don't share our beliefs, they don't have the same respect for human life that we do. we have absolutely no business giving them our money. i thank you very much. hubie: thank you, shane. from maryland. our next caller from ports myth, howe. good morning. caller: good morning. i enjoy your program here. just a quick comment about what's going on in egypt. people don't realize that they it -- america a pretty much put the president there before, and they lived under, generally, what america -- with freedom. now they have this muslim brotherhood guy who came in here and tried to slowly bring back shari'a law to this country. they'll people are
with music i a local singing group. group. local singing america, blow the trumpet of freedom lying down in unity one nation unto god in liberty against the odds we will stand for freedom america ♪ ♪ ♪ let it resound through golden plains from sea to sea and over the purple mountains majesty let it rise above the sea landghout the lambda-- the and be the heartbeat of every man america blow the trumpet of freedom no stopping now we will charge on today might we join ourselves in unity one nation unto god in liberty against the odds we will stand for freedom america ♪ ♪ ♪ [applause] >> thank you so -- is this on? thank you so much. can you help me one more time? what a beautiful, beautiful job. beautiful. horne, is jennifer chairman of the new hampshire republican party. thank you all for being part of this wonderful event. please also join me in saying thank you to our gracious host, the ambassador. [applause] it is a great day to be a republican in the great state of new hampshire. there are so many great opportunities ahead of us. we face a lot of challenges in new hampshire
did that have to do with anything? america, your complete name is your father's surname and your mother's maiden name. that is running. i do not know that. i was home, and i went to my mother [[ spanish] in practiced. uis -- spanish] in [applause] [speaking in spanish] what a wonderful name that i found. the next day i went back to the a youngm and there was girl in the corner and i walked up to her because i had practiced all night, right? i said, hola, hi. luis gutierrez. she raised her hand. --y called her mister [speaking in spanish] [laughter] i am happy you laughed, because that was reaction of the 30 other students in the classroom. they all laughed. it today.h about but it really informs me about how i live my life and who i am, because while everybody was laughing, i never felt so small, so insignificant, so disconnected from everything around me, so humiliated. it is difficult to describe how alienated i felt from everything around me, how alone i felt. you know something? when the laughter stopped -- [speaking in spanish] [indiscernible] we know they exist here in amer
to keep america safe for 7 1/2 years.[applause] and it worked. the record speaks for itself. the cia put out a classified report in 2004. ksm was subjected to enhanced interrogation. a report was published, classified by the cia, and it has been declassified, although it still has parts redacted. the headline is "khalid sheik mohammed preeminent source on al qaeda." that is the place where we learned most of the intelligence we had, at least in the mid part of our time there, about what al qaeda was about, about where they were based, how they were funded, where the training camps were. on 9/11 we did not know that. we knew osama bin laden was in pakistan, but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was get that intelligence and according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him -- because he was subjected more than anybody else to enhanced interrogation techniques. this administration does not get it. they do not. obama made a speech here not too long ago to the national defense university in may and basically said ok, now we are ret
out what the world thinks about america. people want to see americans stay home. host: that refers to how america's involvement in afghanistan weighs upon positions being made. here's what he had to say. [video clip] collects my preference would be that the national community already asked forceful. is ane have seen incapacity for the security counsel to move forward in the face of a clear violation of international norms. i recognize that here in the united states and in great parts of theany world there is a certain afghanistanen there's a suspicion of any military action. on the other hand it is important for us to recognize hundreds of innocent children were killed. -- were killed through the use of a weapon that 98% of a weapon that says should not be used in a war. there is no action that we are sending a signal that that international norm doesn't mean much. host: cooper is up next. i can't help but think -- caller: i can't help but think it sabotages the democratic party. there is not a lot going on there. it's using a sabotage of the democratic party. it sabotage ofe the d
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
. says america who isn't free and runs off to china and russia to tell about it is not exactly my idea of a great american patriot. i do put a lot of trust in the people who had defended the united states of america their entire careers with distinction and with honor and with the .alor when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we are not doing this and you're not doing that and we're not doing this and we asked them the question, then i have got to listen to that before i jerked the rug out from under them. congress is looking at this. it will continue. you, i always worry about the concentrations of power and and eventual liberty. i think that is what keeps free, that individual citizens are passionate about you havethe same time, these abuses. you have got to know where they and i do not think we have lost these freedoms. had, we would not be having this conversation on c- span. it is not china. there is the fbi case and they lost that case -- >> [indiscernible] >> we will see what happens. >> [indiscernible] the consent of the court -- [applause] in the presidential ele
. >> out of america's economic future is being impacted by companies controlling access to the internet. susan crawford, sunday night at 9:00 on "afterwards." continues."journal" host: our guest is congressman alan crazy, a democrat from florida, a member of the foreign affairs committee. -- alan grayson. talk about the news from russia that says edward snowden has been granted a one-your temporary asylum in russia. -- one year temporary asylum in russia. any reaction? guest: it is irrelevant. there should be a debate about whether the government should be receiving a record of every one of our phone calls for that's what we should be talking about, not about the leaker but the leaks. host: this is the headline from " the new york times." i want to get your take on a piece of tape from the committee would senator chuck grassley. [video clip] >> what information does the government collect under this program and specifically is anyone's name, address, social security number, or location collected? >> to answer the second part -- name, address, location, social security number is not coll
will agree with you on that. overall, it is not a gloom and doom situation in america. that is my personal view. i think that in time, it will work itself out. title -- we the must do something about the entitlement program. if it were not for obama, it has been this way for a wild -- you cannot blame him about folks who are getting all of these so- called free services in my opinion. host: what kind of business? caller: we are in mental health. host: and why are you republican? caller: because i believe in their tenets, their principles, smaller government, i believe in that. strong military, i believe not. but they work hard. throw my neighbors overboard because i'm doing well. one time i was not doing so well. so because i'm doing well now, do i say to hell with them and throw them aboard? i don't think so. so we have got to have a better approach how we help you use programs come the state understand you have a lot of folks out here give support because if you give them free stuff, there was a advantage of it. but i do not say because i'm doing well now, to heck with them. all right, l
intent on doing something good when they go around violating the rights of every citizen in america. all the badrs things happening in this a administration that obama calls a hoax. i am sure the mainstream media will jump all over this, but they do not tell us anything else. you see the same headlines for 10 days in a row on the computer. host: thank you for the call. this is a story from " washington times" web site. unnamed u.s. officials told media outlets that intelligence agencies in yemen alerted washington to the threats as the yemeni president came to the u.s. to meet members of congress last thursday." michael is joining us next from philadelphia, democratic line, good morning. caller: thank you for covering this important topic. i was wondering if you have any insight or sources that revealed why it is such a general area being covered as opposed to, say, 36 -- 3 specific countries? that is one question. the other is a common about how unstable these places are these days. pakistan has never been stable in recent memory. a contributing factor. of course then there is the bengh
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
for example? >> if you were dolley madison, you could not go anywhere whether it was a city in america or france without having to shop for her. also very early on she became the patriot jay of the french minister's wife and she schooled her as well. >> she hired a master of ceremonies in the white house who was french and familiar with all of the diplomatic niceties shall we say so that he would explain to her what kind of food was served and what the french taste was and what french qui -- cuisine was about, so she had a number of people who helped school her in this type of thing. >> the white house staff is large and all of this come from the money that they were paid or from their personal wealth, all these extra staff and advisors that you talk about? >> probably most of them did. for instance, one of the things she hired as they called him french john away from the minister from great britain which was a huge slap tofment hire somebody away from somebody someone away else's household particularly when that person was in the diplomatic community was an insult on the one hand or a
is america's last great hope. >> i will tell you something else about t.w. shannon, we spent some time on the road, obviously very articulate, but he is also pretty tough on an airplane with turbulence. i fly just about every other day, so i can take a lot, but there are some times when the plane is going crazy. he is one of these guys who is just turning the page on the newspaper when things are going i respect him for that very much. okay, karen? >> a pleasure to be here. my involvement with women in politics stems from and internships i had in washington, d.c. for one of my home state senators, senator lugar from indiana. that was my first time being around a lot of conservative women who were smart, ambitious, and wanted to have families and careers, and we were trying to figure that all out. feminist voices were not reaching a lot of them, were not reaching me as a young woman. so when i went back to the university of virginia for my third year of undergrad, i sought out an environment what i found in d.c., smart and ambitious woman who wanted to talk about the issues of the day a
forcing -- there is an organizing i'm advising calling the compact for america trying to get a balanced budget amendment and get a convention call a nifty idea to control a run away convention. there are policy innovations that states are trying to put together, again, across a host of areas left, right, which is trying to reassert the original dynamic. not nullify. states cannot say federal law is no good. just to rebalance the power in the country. host: ian, can you speak to federal effort pushing back? if that's the way right to look at this. what is or what can the federal government do once states put these efforts into place? guest: if we are talking about an actual nullification law, that's when the state tries to forbid the federal government from forcing its own law, those laws are void almost automatically. guest: john c. calhoun is probably roaming the studios right now. guest: the federal official would try to enforce the law, presumably the state would try to stop them. and then it would be very easy for the federal government to get a court order to say that the state can
are steps that are confidence building measures. -- ted jada cople has coppel has written, america's chronic overreaction to terrorism, we had excerpts. but the country's capacity for self-inflicted damage must astounded even osama bin laden. there is always the nightmare of acquiring, terrorists acquiring weapons of mass destruction, but nothing would give the terrorists enemies greater satisfaction than that we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict our lives and our liberties accordingly. guest: this is always a difficult debate. i think that if we step back d look at it since 9/11, the united states, even though we're one of the most open and free countries has remained, frankly, open and free. we have continued to have super bowls. we continue to have our people travel abroad. we have robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action, i would use an analogy of it's like a hurricane. we have some weather forecasting that says will is going to be a potential storm. we're battening down the hatches in a few limiting places. if the storm passes,
. . the white house does not belong to just one person, and belongs to the people of america. >> season two of first ladies, from edith roosevelt to michelle obama is live on monday night. we take your calls and facebook comments. willnday night, we conclude the encore presentation of season one will stop -- season one. span, we bring a public affair of events from washington to you. white house readings and conferences. gaveling complete gavel-to- coverage of the house. c-span, created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now, you can watch us in hd. >> a look at the unfolding situation in syria and how humanitarian efforts are being carried out. million refugees have left for neighboring countries. from washington journal, this is 20 minutes. host: joining us next is dr. ron waldman, president of doctors of the world usa, joining us to talk about the group's activities among the world with refugees, in particular the syrian refugee camp from which he has recently returned. thank you for being with us. this is a photo in this week's "n
.s. diplomacy and advance america's interests. couple ofing a minutes late. we will have live coverage when it does get underway here on c- span. >> once again, live pictures from the state department. secretary of state john kerry excited to name shaun casey to head the state department's first office that is dedicated to out reach the global faith community and religious leaders. wayside this to get underway in just a moment. some news out of the white house this morning, if you are listening to "washington journal" this morning, rushing to in -- president obama planning to cancel a one-on-one meeting with russian president putin. it is in retribution to russia's decision to grant asylum to nsa security leaguer edward snowden. it is also first-rate with rush on an array of other issues including missile defense and human rights. says obama still plans to attend the g 20 summit, but a one-on-one meeting with president putin has been postponed. president obama will also at a stop in sweden to his early september travel itinerary. in a statement today, senator schumer, democrat of new york,
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
went around america. it could put up maybe 2 million jobs. compromise with the tea party and the regular republicans? they are a bunch of zeroes. they do not want to work with this president. look at medicare and social security. how they want to break that down -- but the american people work for at all their life. they want to break that down to nothing. they do not care about america. they do not care about this president. host: stephen is from richmond virginia. a few tweets -- our last caller brought up the idea of the health-care law and how it is playing into this debate. here's a story from today's "new york times" on that subject -- -- also known as obamacare. we are taking your thoughts on these budgetary issues that are facing congress and the country. ron is up next from tampa, florida on our republican line. what do you think about that proposal to hold off federal federal funding measure includes financing for the affordable care act? forward. would be all i just think compromises a big joke. the democratsthat have their way. a city in california went bankru
in the way that urban america is perceived is too big of a story to ignore. >> where the american dream is moving. sunday night at 9:00. >> public affairs event from washington directly to you. putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house of vince, briefings and conferences. offering gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house as a public service of private industry. created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago, and funded by your local travel -- cable or satellite provider. >> ease into a first ladies, influence and image, against monday, september 9 -- all this month we are showing episodes from season one. watch it each weeknight. next, the life of james madison's wife, dolly madison. madison. ♪ >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got th
in the united states. good evening and welcome to c-span's continuing series on america's first ladies. tonight, you will learn about lucy webb hayes. the wife of rutherford the hayes. here to start us off is a first ladies historian and author of a collection of biographies. welcome. in 1876, the country is joyously celebrating the 100th centennial of the declaration of independence and it is an election year. the election is greatly contested with no clear victor. tell us about the atmosphere with which it was at the white house. what was it like? >> susan, it is pretty schizophrenic, to tell you the truth. we had just come out of the centennial celebration. they were coming to the white house, but they do not know if they will move into the white house. the election is not yet decided. what happened is samuel and rutherford b. hayes were in one of the closest elections in the united states at that point. and tilden wins the popular vote. there are three states that are so tight, the parties are tackling each other. the republicans said, we won. the democrats said, no, we won. hayes goes to b
and concerned about things. >> that is on my business card. >> we replicate the procedures that america follows of authorizing stuff by legislation , setting decisions by court, supervising it by inspector general's. done in a to be secret way in order that enemies do not find out about it and could therefore it made it. that is the way it goes. >> and do not exclude the possibility of new legislation. if congress wants to fix it, they have oversight abilities to hear all this material in classified form and decide whether they want to tweak the law. >> you would prefer to see, i suspect, open debate before the supreme court, but you could go the congressional route to address the concerns you have raised. >> i guess they each have their own functions. one determines what the legislation should be. one determines what is constitutional. my preference would be that both get their shot at it. but that is just me. more,oing to ask only one because i am told there are 20 minutes remaining, and i want to give you time on the floor. briefly, would each of you give your observations on civil , a board
. unconstitutional. it goes against what america's founding fathers have said. >> that is a great question. prism program is largely classified. there has been some talk about it. i have to be careful with what i say. the bottom line is, there are too many people in congress right now who are forgetting that there is a constitution that restricts what they do. the point of the constitution is to restrict what the federal government does. in the name of security, they are forgetting that their first right or the is to protect liberties. that is why we have a government to ensure that we have liberty as a people. that is what they are forgetting. they are focused solely on the security aspect. ory think as long as the nsa some other agency is stopping bad guys, they can go after collecting information on all sorts of people and have no consequences. of course, there is a huge threat to that. we do not want the government to have this kind of data to use against americans in the future. >> yeah. about,'m also worried like, all the gay rights stuff. i'm thinking, like, this could be like the racism t
in our current efforts to keep america safe. let's understand it. that does not mean a reporter should go to jail, but the context is, there is a responsible press by and large. i certainly respect that.i support the press shield law. we have to find a better way to stop leaks of material that compromise our sources and methods. >> i want to move onto another subject that is very big and important. that is drone strikes and the future of our war on terror. it has all been predicated on the authorization to use military force after 9/11, which identified our enemy as al qaeda. jay, you gave a major speech in oxford last year looking toward the future. but i am hung up still on the phrase, associated forces. who are the associated forces of al qaeda who are our enemy right now? >> well, you are correct that for the last four years while i was in office, the interpretation that we adopted in the executive branch referred to al qaeda, the taliban, and the associated forces. that was an interpretation of the executive branch that was endorsed by the courts specifically to include the concept o
. these people are different. they do not have to think the way a political science book in america describes them overall. i agree with you. there is a dilemma. if you begin your sense of moving -- you know what that is. that is not political at all. rituals are very important. men and women are different. you do not talk to the old the way you talk to the young. you do not avoid banks -- to move from this kind of islam to say that islam is everything and it should be everywhere -- it governs also the public life. that move indicates that the person is the satisfied with the normal customs and traditions. there is a process to go through, either by hitting the books -- this dichotomy, to what extent egypt in law is moving away by figures is not real. i will give you a simple fact. in the 1940's, there was a committee that drafted the civil code. there was an egyptian jurist and a professor. they came with the project and first it was sent to the lawyers and judges to comment on. one of the judges -- he attended and there was a member of the committee looking at the draft. he keeps saying, "t
of america are too stupid to realize they're voting against their own interests by not voting health care for themselves. have a nice day. host: sue, your message to congress? caller: i want to be at your health care plan, congress. host: what do you think should be done about the health care law? host: if they vote it in for us, they should be under the same health care. host: do you think should be defunded? caller: yes, i do. host: have you send that message to a member of congress? caller: i have not. host of the to attend a town hall meeting? caller: yes, i have. --t: who is did you go to whose did you go to? caller: ron paul. host: when was that? m, when he was running last time? host: thank you. next caller. caller tell my message to them is -- caller: my message to them is that obama care is coming in with -- medicare was here before obama care. if we take money at of this out of thisot -- program to fund that one, that money should have changed the medicare program around. why do we need obama care when we could have restructured medicare and medicaid? they would not need to take
to say what is happening in rural america in general. what we have found is, particularly in the south and southwest, rural school districts have been consolidated almost to the hills. very large districts in their role self. we think, to a large extent, we have reached the economies of scale in these communities. that makes sense for those communities. but what happens, for the most part, you do not achieve cost savings and the quality that most proponents of consolidation assume that you will achieve by consolidation. particularly in the rural sites, you see it increased costs around transportation, lots more travel time for kids on buses, a much longer day. we have kids getting on the bus before daylight and they are getting off after sunset. when you factor those things into the formula of what is working, what should be the response to the small school problem -- and i do not like to think of it as a small school or small district problem -- it is a situation that exists that does not have to be problematic. when we look at it in terms of dollars saved by increasing numbers and re
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